Online in Kyrgyzstan

By Rob Packer

Simply put, it’s different in Kyrgyzstan.

I was told I’d have internet in my apartment. When I arrived I found an Ethernet cable, and once I’d worked out that didn’t work I followed the cable to the modem to see what I could do there. Instead of going to a modem, the cable went through the wall and then out the window to the roof. The engineer came to fix it and still I wasn’t shown any modems and could only imagine the mess of cables on the roof. I could get online so I just put it down to another difference of life in Kyrgyzstan.

Getting online in Kyrgyzstan. First, plug in the Ethernet cable.

Out the window. Follow the cable. Where it stops, nobody knows.

And then to the roof.

And then my internet password suddenly stopped working. When I asked at work they told me I’d probably run out of money. Suddenly I realized that I was on pay-as-you-go internet, and I think no-one had explained it to me because they’d assumed that was the way it always is. I was taken down to the supermarket to something that looked like an ATM where I could load up cash onto my account (or do the same with my phone or gas bill), so I was now unstoppable. I’d naively assumed that I was on a time-based package, but actually my charges were entirely volume-based. When you’ve got used to limitless internet, this is a real adjustment: does anyone really know how many megabytes you get through? I started to cut down on Skype video calls and YouTube, but in two months in Kyrgyzstan, I could never work out how to tell how much credit I had left. The warning you’re running out of credit is that it just stops working, so I lived in fear of the midnight stroll.

Top up at the Tochka. This photo is slightly unfair because a lot are in a lot more salubrious places than this underpass in central Bishkek.

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